Candidates For The First Issue Special!

Because I despise the canceled comics thread and the deathwatch-like attitude it spews, let's rectify the situation and put our energies towards pointing readers to new first issues of comics (not trades, not ogns) in order to support them and their growth from the start.

First up - today's release of PRETTY DEADLY #1 from Image Comics by Kelly Sue DeConnick and Emma Rios (no relation). Haven't read it yet, but the artwork is lovely to pour over.
https://www.imagecomics.com/comics/releases/pretty-deadly-1
http://steinerfrommars.tumblr.com/

image

Other new number ones this week:

CONAN PEOPLE OF THE BLACK CIRCLE #1 (Dark Horse)
http://www.darkhorse.com/Comics/24-074/Conan-and-the-People-of-the-Black-Circle-1

BEWARE THE BATMAN #1 (DC)
http://www.dccomics.com/comics/beware-the-batman-2013/beware-the-batman-1

SAMURAI JACK #1 (IDW)
http://www.previewsworld.com/Home/1/1/71/952?stockItemID=AUG130368

VELVET #1 (Image)
https://www.imagecomics.com/comics/releases/velvet-1

DEPT OF MONSTEROLOGY 1 (Renegade Arts)
http://www.renegadeartsentertainment.com/dept-of-monsterology

What did you get? What looks interesting? Discussion should be about these comics or any new ongoing #1s that are missing from the weekly list. Everything else is off-topic. Spread the word if something on here is something you want to see stick around!


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Comments

  • ElsiebubElsiebub Posts: 338
    I've been looking forward to Velvet for months and months now. And I just ordered Pretty Deadly because people keep talking about it and it looks neat.
  • Mr_CosmicMr_Cosmic Posts: 3,183
    Of those listed I've ordered Velvet, Samurai Jack, and Pretty Deadly from DCBS.

    I haven't read them yet but I'm most excited for Velvet. Two of my favorite creators teaming up again. Impossible for me to pass up.

    Samurai Jack was a great cartoon and I'm hoping this comic can tap into that same action and fun.

    Pretty Deadly is a book that I'm giving a chance because of the artist. I really enjoyed her work on a Doctor Strange mini she did a few years back. Kelly Sue DeConnick hasn't impressed me with her work for Marvel but maybe I'll enjoy what she does away from superheroes.
  • CaptShazamCaptShazam Posts: 1,172
    Looking forward to Velvet. Image may be the top publisher (content wise) in the business right now.
  • Just finished Velvet and I am chomping at the bit for #2. Have Pretty Deadly, and will probably read it tomorrow. Emma Rios is a beast.
  • luke52luke52 Posts: 1,353
    Sex Criminals #1 Reprint was out yesterday, as well as #2. Really fun and funny comics from Matt Fraction. A lot of controversy surrounding this book at the moment too. Unwarranted I think. But that's besides a point. Great art, funny reading and also a little heart in there too. Looking forward to #2 coming through the door.
  • The Double Life Of Miranda Turner 1:
    A digital book from Monkeybrain also came out this week that looks pretty good.
    monkeybraincomics.com/2013/10/30/the-double-life-of-miranda-turner-1/
  • mguy1977mguy1977 Posts: 801
    edited November 2013
    I preordered both Velvet #1 (it is Brubaker goodness in the past I enjoyed his Criminal & Fatale work so I'm trying this book too) & Superman/Wonder Woman #1 (yes it is peanut butter & chocolate mixed together in comics form Superman & Wonder Woman). I will be reading both of these titles once they are delivered by FedEx later on today.

    Matthew
  • Mr_CosmicMr_Cosmic Posts: 3,183
    The only comic I ordered in Peter's latest post is Sandman Overture #1. I'll be holding on to these until they're all out and then I'll sit down and read them all in a row.
  • PeterPeter Posts: 442
    That's how I read minis as well. Although I'm wondering if the eventual SOverture collection is probably the better way to go. I imagine it'll be full of backstory and other material. Grrr.... that crazy habit of having to read things now! :)
  • Mr_CosmicMr_Cosmic Posts: 3,183
    edited November 2013
    DCBS box arrived today and I have to say that Pretty Deadly #1 was pretty awesome. I got a bit of an East of West vibe from it..with Death falling for a mortal woman and having a baby etc. I won't be ripping my copy.

    I read the first issue of Three by Kieron Gillen. A very historic look at Sparta..as opposed to Miller's..and it might remove any heroic notions you might have about Spartans.

    Samurai Jack felt just like an episode of the cartoon. Great action and a story that sets Jack on a quest that might help him finally travel back to his own time.

    Velvet is on the top of my reading pile for tomorrow.
  • Mr_CosmicMr_Cosmic Posts: 3,183
    The first issue of Velvet was a good read. Brubaker set up an interesting mystery and Epting's art was awesome as always. I only wish the story dealt with real spies instead of spies belonging to a secret organization nobody else knows about.
  • Mr_Cosmic said:

    The first issue of Velvet was a good read. Brubaker set up an interesting mystery and Epting's art was awesome as always. I only wish the story dealt with real spies instead of spies belonging to a secret organization nobody else knows about.

    But we have Queen & Country for that!

    Actually that was kinda what I was hoping for, but after reading Velvet I realized that this was also something I really wanted. Not nearly enough Spy-fi on the comic rack these days.
  • PlaneisPlaneis Posts: 980
    So... I just bought Sandman Overture.... anybody read it yet? I'm psyched.
  • TorchsongTorchsong Posts: 2,698
    I know we're talking first issues here, as in single issue comics, but manga have firsts as well...unfortunately we only get 'em in tankobon (trade) format. So I hope this won't be considered too off-topic if I pop the occasional first volume of a manga on this list to see if there's interest. Because I have a good'un for you:

    image

    That Japanese roughly translates to "No Matter How I Look at it, It's You Guys' Fault I'm Not Popular". Fifteen-year-old Tomoko Kuroki believed that she would become popular upon entering high school because she'd become well-versed in the world of otome games (dating sims, etc.). In reality, she finds that she has become an unsociable loner and she is forced to take a long hard look at herself for the first time in years. The story follows Tomoko as she attempts to improve her social status as she progresses through high school.

    This book hit the shelves last week and if your cup of tea is a protagonist so comicly pathetic that you keep thinking things can't get any worse for her (then they do)...this is your book. It's an underhanded swipe at many anime/manga tropes (ex. In her games she sees that characters who show no emotion are popular (think Rei from Evangelion) so she goes through her day trying to show ZERO emotion...it doesn't quite go as planned).

    I know manga isn't everyone's thing...the boom may have come and gone...but in its wake the publishers that are still around are focusing on licensed titles for an older crowd now (their original fanbase grew up, eh? Sound familiar?) So we're seeing a lot more variety on the shelves than ever before. It's not just two people fighting for 180 pages anymore...
  • David_DDavid_D Posts: 3,612
    "... your honor."

    ;)
  • TorchsongTorchsong Posts: 2,698
    edited November 2013
    David_D said:

    "... your honor."

    ;)

    This one's perfectly safe...I don't read that fanservice-y stuff...

    ...anymore...

    ...as far as you know. ;)

    (In all seriousness, yes, this one's safe for work...the humor content is the real thing here...you'll never read a more pathetic character in your life...much less laugh your ass off at her).
  • Mr_CosmicMr_Cosmic Posts: 3,183
    Only Amazing X-Men for me this week.
  • luke52luke52 Posts: 1,353
    I have Drumhellar coming this week.
  • luke52luke52 Posts: 1,353
    Drumhellar is weird. Not good. Not bad. Weird.
  • PeterPeter Posts: 442
    I tend to pick up any first issue with Riley Rossmo on art. I have yet to see Drumhellar, though.
  • luke52luke52 Posts: 1,353
    It's done enough to warrant me picking up #2, but it certainly hasn't hooked me.
  • David_DDavid_D Posts: 3,612
    edited November 2013
    For some recent first issues, Velvet #1 has been the best I've read in a few months. I think anyone that has been missing Brubaker and Epting's superspy flavor from the beginning of their Captain America run should check this out. As should anyone who likes their spy stories to have a dash of, not fantasy, because It is still in the real world, but that pushing-the-boundary-of-belief flavor of James Bond and some of the British spy TV shows. A great hook of a start. Looking forward to the next.

    I am becoming more and more of a fan of Kieron Gillen. His and Ryan Kelly's Three has a really interesting intent, as explained in the backmatter, but the story and characters of the first issue didn't really grab me. I will probably try one or two more issues to give it a chance, but the first issue felt a little like he was so in love with the research he had done, and in trying to establish the time, place, and culture (including pushing back against what we think of Spartans based on other works) that the characters weren't given as much attention to form. We'll see.
  • Manifest Destiny is kinda cool. The art reminds me a bit of Shawn McManus (that's a good thing in my book), and the story is intriguing. I'll give it a few issues and see how it goes.
  • GregGreg Posts: 1,925
    I'm sold on Manifest Destiny and Umbral.
  • David_DDavid_D Posts: 3,612
    edited November 2013
    I got and have already read Manifest Destiny. I thought the art was great, I thought the writing on the first issue leaned too heavily on some easy exposition devices (someone writing a journal entry; pairs of people standing around talking about the situation they are in). I like the premise, but I wish the first issue could more dynamically introduce us to the premise, rather than do a lot of standing around downloading the premise. But, the art, and the potential, are enough to get me to try at least one more issue.

    Also, and this may be too much of an inside baseball digression, but I have to admit that books from Skybound rub me the wrong way-- it seems that this is the imprint that Kirkman has built to invite other writers to, like him, be credited as the sole creators of a comic. Surely artists are being paid, and for all I know being paid very well and given great royalties, I have no insight into that-- but it is definitely the imprint where a writer can be the only one granted the title of "creator" of a new work of comics: A world, and new characters, even if they didn't draw, or perhaps didn't even design, a thing. That doesn't feel right to me. And, hell, in the case of Thief of Thieves, you can be the sole "Creator" when you aren't even scripting the issues OR drawing them.

    And these books, in the indicia, are wholly the property of Skybound. So- if I read this indicia right- that unlike many other Image books, as well as even many of the creator owned works at Vertigo, Icon, Dynamite, Boom, Dark Horse, Avatar, and others, these are books where you can be the capital-C Creator, but not the owner.

    So, it seems, that Kirkman has created a place for creators to do the sort of work that is what he told creators they shouldn't take back in his manifesto in 2008. And that just rubs me the wrong way. Whatever little button in my brain that makes me feel good about buying a creator-owned book, like most Image books, is not pressed by Skybound.

    I bought Umbral, looking forward to reading that on the weekend. Looked like too meaty of a read for the subway.
  • David_D said:

    I got and have already read Manifest Destiny. I thought the art was great, I thought the writing on the first issue leaned too heavily on some easy exposition devices (someone writing a journal entry; pairs of people standing around talking about the situation they are in). I like the premise, but I wish the first issue could more dynamically introduce us to the premise, rather than do a lot of standing around downloading the premise. But, the art, and the potential, are enough to get me to try at least one more issue.

    Also, and this may be too much of an inside baseball digression, but I have to admit that books from Skybound rub me the wrong way-- it seems that this is the imprint that Kirkman has built to invite other writers to, like him, be credited as the sole creators of a comic. Surely artists are being paid, and for all I know being paid very well and given great royalties, I have no insight into that-- but it is definitely the imprint where a writer can be the only one granted the title of "creator" of a new work of comics: A world, and new characters, even if they didn't draw, or perhaps didn't even design, a thing. That doesn't feel right to me. And, hell, in the case of Thief of Thieves, you can be the sole "Creator" when you aren't even scripting the issues OR drawing them.

    And these books, in the indicia, are wholly the property of Skybound. So- if I read this indicia right- that unlike many other Image books, as well as even many of the creator owned works at Vertigo, Icon, Dynamite, Boom, Dark Horse, Avatar, and others, these are books where you can be the capital-C Creator, but not the owner.

    So, it seems, that Kirkman has created a place for creators to do the sort of work that is what he told creators they shouldn't take back in his manifesto in 2008. And that just rubs me the wrong way. Whatever little button in my brain that makes me feel good about buying a creator-owned book, like most Image books, is not pressed by Skybound.

    I bought Umbral, looking forward to reading that on the weekend. Looked like too meaty of a read for the subway.

    Yeah, it's definitely a bit of hypocrisy on Kirkman’s part, but in this day and age, everyone involved should know what they're getting into, and as longer as they're satisfied with the working arrangement, who are we to say it’s wrong? And if they grow dissatisfied, they can always leave the book.
  • David_DDavid_D Posts: 3,612

    David_D said:

    I got and have already read Manifest Destiny. I thought the art was great, I thought the writing on the first issue leaned too heavily on some easy exposition devices (someone writing a journal entry; pairs of people standing around talking about the situation they are in). I like the premise, but I wish the first issue could more dynamically introduce us to the premise, rather than do a lot of standing around downloading the premise. But, the art, and the potential, are enough to get me to try at least one more issue.

    Also, and this may be too much of an inside baseball digression, but I have to admit that books from Skybound rub me the wrong way-- it seems that this is the imprint that Kirkman has built to invite other writers to, like him, be credited as the sole creators of a comic. Surely artists are being paid, and for all I know being paid very well and given great royalties, I have no insight into that-- but it is definitely the imprint where a writer can be the only one granted the title of "creator" of a new work of comics: A world, and new characters, even if they didn't draw, or perhaps didn't even design, a thing. That doesn't feel right to me. And, hell, in the case of Thief of Thieves, you can be the sole "Creator" when you aren't even scripting the issues OR drawing them.

    And these books, in the indicia, are wholly the property of Skybound. So- if I read this indicia right- that unlike many other Image books, as well as even many of the creator owned works at Vertigo, Icon, Dynamite, Boom, Dark Horse, Avatar, and others, these are books where you can be the capital-C Creator, but not the owner.

    So, it seems, that Kirkman has created a place for creators to do the sort of work that is what he told creators they shouldn't take back in his manifesto in 2008. And that just rubs me the wrong way. Whatever little button in my brain that makes me feel good about buying a creator-owned book, like most Image books, is not pressed by Skybound.

    I bought Umbral, looking forward to reading that on the weekend. Looked like too meaty of a read for the subway.

    Yeah, it's definitely a bit of hypocrisy on Kirkman’s part, but in this day and age, everyone involved should know what they're getting into, and as longer as they're satisfied with the working arrangement, who are we to say it’s wrong? And if they grow dissatisfied, they can always leave the book.
    Of course. And I am sure that they go in knowing what they are getting into, and likely glad for the work. I get that. I think it just rubs me the wrong way since Image often (and USUALLY rightly so) praises itself as being a place for creator owned comics, and yet one of the main faces of the company- and past, very vocal advocate of creator owned comics- seems to be doing that thing that the original partners, flush with money, did in the early days. When they went from striking out to be independent, to then bulking out their studios with work-for-hire talent.

    Now, to be fair, I don't know what deals those working (but it seems, not owning) for Skybound have. Likely much better than how some of the people assigned to imitate the Image founders got treated.

    But it all seems a but like the end of Orwell's Animal Farm to me. It does not prohibit me buying Skybound books (just as it doesn't prevent me from buying licensed books, or other work-for-hire). But it is definitely something I notice. And I always get a beter feeling when I check the indicia and see the main creators of the book also credited as the owners. To me, THAT feels like creator owned comics.

    Anyway, back to the first issues. . .
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