check this childhood treasure I got.

I did a side job for a friend and included in the deal was this the old 1977 Spidey 33rpm record and read along book with the mam wolf story in it. What a Kewl piece of my childhood to grab up.

Comments

  • jaydee74jaydee74 Posts: 1,501
    Post a picture of it.
  • dubbat138dubbat138 Posts: 3,079
    Nice,I love those Power Records.
  • PrilloPrillo Posts: 23
    Finally got to a spot with enough mobile service to upload a tweet. I couldn't find a way to do a straight upload from my phone. Hope this link works well enough.
    http://t.co/GLVFqGrIXG
    ()
  • TrustyMutsiTrustyMutsi Posts: 161
    I remember that! I used to get that from the library all the time when I was little!
  • rebisrebis Posts: 1,820
    Nice! I really enjoy the old book & record stuff.
  • batlawbatlaw Posts: 838
    I still have a Batman storybook cassette from mu childhood.
  • PrilloPrillo Posts: 23
    I wonder if the stories are reprints or made for the record book exclusively
  • kiwijasekiwijase Posts: 434
    edited April 2013
    photo BHRihslCUAEAaCA_zps19e963d6.jpg

    There ya go folks! I fondly remember the "Mark Of The Manwolf" Story. @Prillo, that was issue #124 of "Amazing Spiderman", released way back in 1973. Groovy.
  • PrilloPrillo Posts: 23
    Thanks for making the pic show @kiwijase

    I remember when I was like six or seven going thru that story over and over. It was such a geek moment when I finally got my hands on it. All I need is a record player now. lol
  • Chuck_MelvilleChuck_Melville Posts: 3,003
    Prillo said:

    I wonder if the stories are reprints or made for the record book exclusively

    I once had a friend who had several of those Power Records, and from what I can recall they were all reprints (and dramatizations) of stories that had been previously published by Marvel. I also recall there were several Star Treks, which I assume were original stories.


  • PrilloPrillo Posts: 23
    edited April 2013
    Now that you mention it I think I recall either seeing or having the star trek one. I wonder if they have it at Bender's in Newport News. That place has all sorts of vintage star wars and star trek items along with their comics. I found Lor and Data figures one time
  • chriswchrisw Posts: 792
    I used to have that. Actually, I still may, somewhere back at my parent's house. I can still remember the sound effects of the Man-Wolf growling. I seem to recall him breaking in through a window, too. It's strange the details you remember from stuff like this that you played all the time. I used to have a Superman record and the story involved these bullets from space - I can still hear that whistling noise they made when I think back on that.
  • SolitaireRoseSolitaireRose Posts: 1,445
    I LOVED the Power Records stuff. They usually took comics, edited them a bit for kids and then did wonderful audio adaptations of them. As a kid, I must have listened to that Spider-Man album for months!
  • nweathingtonnweathington Posts: 4,719
    I had a few of them as a kid—still have them, but they’re a bit warped now. My brother and I loved the Captain America one, which adapted Captain America #168. It was so over-the-top melodramatic it cracked us up every time we listened to it. The adaptation of Man-Thing #5 was probably my favorite, though I liked the Batman “Stacked Cards” too, plus it had Adams/Giordano artwork.
    I also recall there were several Star Treks, which I assume were original stories.
    Yes, there were several original Star Trek recordings. I had “The Crier in Emptiness,” which involved the Enterprise’s contact with an alien life from made of sound. It was a good story, but I didn’t listen to it very often because in the places where the alien gets angry, it was very uncomfortable to hear. The artwork was done by Continuity Studios, but I have no idea if Neal did any work on it or not; it doesn’t appear he had much of a direct hand in it just by looking at it. The oddest part was that in the comic Uhura was drawn as a white woman, and Sulu as a black man. That always confused me as a kid. Perhaps they weren’t able to get the approvals to use their likenesses.
  • Chuck_MelvilleChuck_Melville Posts: 3,003
    edited April 2013

    Yes, there were several original Star Trek recordings. I had “The Crier in Emptiness,” which involved the Enterprise’s contact with an alien life from made of sound. It was a good story, but I didn’t listen to it very often because in the places where the alien gets angry, it was very uncomfortable to hear. The artwork was done by Continuity Studios, but I have no idea if Neal did any work on it or not; it doesn’t appear he had much of a direct hand in it just by looking at it.

    I expect he might have had a small hand in it. I once paid a visit to the Continuity Studios around about that period, and I was briefly acquainted with one of the apprentices there. From what I saw and heard, Adams kept a watch on everything being done there, but didn't directly insert himself into any given project except to make sure it was on spec. The apprentice I knew drew a Wonder Woman story that was inked by (and entirely credited to) Dick Giordano; Adams checked the pencils and tightened up the likenesses of the featured characters. I wouldn't doubt that he might have done the same on the Star Trek art.
  • nweathingtonnweathington Posts: 4,719

    Yes, there were several original Star Trek recordings. I had “The Crier in Emptiness,” which involved the Enterprise’s contact with an alien life from made of sound. It was a good story, but I didn’t listen to it very often because in the places where the alien gets angry, it was very uncomfortable to hear. The artwork was done by Continuity Studios, but I have no idea if Neal did any work on it or not; it doesn’t appear he had much of a direct hand in it just by looking at it.

    I expect he might have had a small hand in it. I once paid a visit to the Continuity Studios around about that period, and I was briefly acquainted with one of the apprentices there. From what I saw and heard, Adams kept a watch on everything being done there, but didn't directly insert himself into any given project except to make sure it was on spec. The apprentice I knew drew a Wonder Woman story that was inked by (and entirely credited to) Dick Giordano; Adams checked the pencils and tightened up the likenesses of the featured characters. I wouldn't doubt that he might have done the same on the Star Trek art.
    I just pulled it out and looked at it again. There are three, maybe four faces he might have done something on, but I don’t see his touch otherwise. I’m pretty sure Giordano did at least some of the inking. And I’m thinking Mike Nasser might have done some work on it. He joined Continuity in ’75, which was around the time these were being produced, and some of the figures look like his handiwork.
  • PrilloPrillo Posts: 23
    God I love these forums...so much to learn
  • dubbat138dubbat138 Posts: 3,079

    I had a few of them as a kid—still have them, but they’re a bit warped now. My brother and I loved the Captain America one, which adapted Captain America #168. It was so over-the-top melodramatic it cracked us up every time we listened to it. The adaptation of Man-Thing #5 was probably my favorite, though I liked the Batman “Stacked Cards” too, plus it had Adams/Giordano artwork.

    I also recall there were several Star Treks, which I assume were original stories.
    Yes, there were several original Star Trek recordings. I had “The Crier in Emptiness,” which involved the Enterprise’s contact with an alien life from made of sound. It was a good story, but I didn’t listen to it very often because in the places where the alien gets angry, it was very uncomfortable to hear. The artwork was done by Continuity Studios, but I have no idea if Neal did any work on it or not; it doesn’t appear he had much of a direct hand in it just by looking at it. The oddest part was that in the comic Uhura was drawn as a white woman, and Sulu as a black man. That always confused me as a kid. Perhaps they weren’t able to get the approvals to use their likenesses.

    That was a strange issue of Man-Thing to adapt. The whole clown suicide thing just seems like something you wouldn't market towards kids. But that Power Record was the first time I read Man Thing and one of the reasons I became a fan.
  • Chuck_MelvilleChuck_Melville Posts: 3,003
    dubbat138 said:

    That was a strange issue of Man-Thing to adapt. The whole clown suicide thing just seems like something you wouldn't market towards kids. But that Power Record was the first time I read Man Thing and one of the reasons I became a fan.

    It may have been a strange story to sell to kids, but I'd thought at the time -- and even today -- that it was one of the very best of the Man-Thing stories ever done. Steve Gerber and Mike Ploog at their best.
  • nweathingtonnweathington Posts: 4,719

    dubbat138 said:

    That was a strange issue of Man-Thing to adapt. The whole clown suicide thing just seems like something you wouldn't market towards kids. But that Power Record was the first time I read Man Thing and one of the reasons I became a fan.

    It may have been a strange story to sell to kids, but I'd thought at the time -- and even today -- that it was one of the very best of the Man-Thing stories ever done. Steve Gerber and Mike Ploog at their best.
    I agree with both of you. It was definitely an odd choice in terms of subject matter, but it was an excellent story. I was six at the time I got the record, and I never had any problem getting my head around the story even though it was probably my first exposure to the concept of suicide. But, then, parents in general weren’t as over-protective of their kids as they seem to be these days. In my own parenting, I try very hard not to underestimate what my kids are capable of handling, and I wouldn’t have had a problem with them listening to/reading this story when they were six.
  • PrilloPrillo Posts: 23
    God I love these forums...so much to learn
  • chriswchrisw Posts: 792
    There was also a Tomb of Dracula one that I remember had him stranded on a snowy mountain top (The Himalayas, maybe?), and he killed a goat to drink its blood to survive. As a kid, I always found that one weird (the overall story didn't seem well-suited to the Power Records format), and when I re-read the story years later in an Omnibus, I was just as baffled as to why they chose it. It fell right in the middle of a longer story arc, so they had to chop off the beginning and ending to make it work, leaving just Dracula trapped on a mountain for 20 pages.
  • dubbat138dubbat138 Posts: 3,079
    chrisw said:

    There was also a Tomb of Dracula one that I remember had him stranded on a snowy mountain top (The Himalayas, maybe?), and he killed a goat to drink its blood to survive. As a kid, I always found that one weird (the overall story didn't seem well-suited to the Power Records format), and when I re-read the story years later in an Omnibus, I was just as baffled as to why they chose it. It fell right in the middle of a longer story arc, so they had to chop off the beginning and ending to make it work, leaving just Dracula trapped on a mountain for 20 pages.

    There is also a Frankenstein and Werewolf by night Power Record.
  • dubbat138dubbat138 Posts: 3,079

    dubbat138 said:

    That was a strange issue of Man-Thing to adapt. The whole clown suicide thing just seems like something you wouldn't market towards kids. But that Power Record was the first time I read Man Thing and one of the reasons I became a fan.

    It may have been a strange story to sell to kids, but I'd thought at the time -- and even today -- that it was one of the very best of the Man-Thing stories ever done. Steve Gerber and Mike Ploog at their best.
    I agree with both of you. It was definitely an odd choice in terms of subject matter, but it was an excellent story. I was six at the time I got the record, and I never had any problem getting my head around the story even though it was probably my first exposure to the concept of suicide. But, then, parents in general weren’t as over-protective of their kids as they seem to be these days. In my own parenting, I try very hard not to underestimate what my kids are capable of handling, and I wouldn’t have had a problem with them listening to/reading this story when they were six.
    Yeah,I wouldn't have any issues with my youngest reading it. 2 years ago when he came to visit,he read my Essential Man-Thing volume 1. He loved it so much that I got him both Essential Man Thing volumes for X-mas.
  • bralinatorbralinator Posts: 5,481

    I had a few of them as a kid—still have them, but they’re a bit warped now. My brother and I loved the Captain America one, which adapted Captain America #168. It was so over-the-top melodramatic it cracked us up every time we listened to it.

Sign In or Register to comment.